Learn To Grow Like A Pro: Organic Gardening Advice

Posted By on February 5, 2014

Learn To Grow Like A Pro: Organic Gardening Advice

The world of organic gardening is very vast and exciting. There are so many ways that one can enter and use their knowledge of this field to help themselves grow healthier “green” plants. It depends completely on your skills and environment. That said, no matter what your organic gardening skills are, here are some tips to help you along.

Take steps to protect earthworms in your organic garden. Till your soil minimally, as tilling can kill earthworms. The best tilling depth is 3 to 5 inches. Avoid using chemical fertilizers because they harm the micro-organisms in the soil, decreasing earthworm activity. Be sure that the soil never dries out too much, but at the same time avoid over-watering. By maintaining these soil conditions, you will notice your earthworm population increasing rapidly!

Water your plants during the morning to avoid having fungal growth that generally prefers moisture and darkness. By watering your plants during the day they are best able to take advantage of the sun, and utilize the suns anti-bacterial effects. Some bacteria or fungi are light sensitive, so by watering during the day you benefit the plant by reducing the growth potential of its competitors.

If you are experiencing a problem with slugs or other insects, a wonderful organic contact pesticide is diatomaceous earth. You can buy this at most garden centers, and it comes in a white powder form. It is an abrasive material that will kill the critters by damaging the skin of the slugs and joints of the insects.

Choose a site for fruit trees depending on their specific requirements. Most fruit trees require 8 hours of sun per day. Morning sun is important, as it dries dew rapidly, helping to prevent fungus. Avoid planting fruit trees in a low spot in the garden where frost or cold air can collect. Some fruit trees are especially susceptible to late frost damage, and are better planted on a north-facing slope. This is especially true for peach, plum, cherry and apricot trees.

Keep track of your organic garden’s progress in a gardening journal. Make note of everything – the dates you plant, the dates you fertilize, pests that arrive, which repellents work, when you begin harvesting, and how fruitful your garden is. This information will be valuable to you as you plan your garden in the years ahead and will help you to be a successful gardener.

If you have plants that love acid in your organic garden, especially tomato plants, then coffee grounds make great mulch. It’s simple to scatter the coffee grounds around your plants and then sit back and let the high levels of nitrogen help your acid-loving plants grow to great heights all summer long.

If you need to protect your plants in your organic garden from frost either early in the season or at the end of the season, here’s a great frugal way to cover them. Milk jugs, soda bottles and other plastic containers you can find around the house are perfect to protect your precious plants from the harsh frost.

To conserve water and protect your plants, use a soaker hose instead of a sprinkler. A soaker hose is a hose with small holes that lies at the base of your plants and administers water directly to the soil. This deters evaporation and keeps water from touching the foliage, which can cause fungus and disease.

When starting an organic garden, test the pH level of your soil. You need to know the pH level of your soil in order to choose the appropriate plants that will grow in it. For example, plants that favor an alkaline soil will not do well in acidic soil. Test kits can be purchased to test the pH level of your soil.

Try using ladybugs rather than pesticides to protect your plants from insects. You can order large quantities of ladybugs from gardening supply stores for very little money. If you release them near your garden, they will eat pests such as aphids, leaf hoppers, mites and other soft bodied insects, helping to protect your plants from these unwanted critters in the process.

Employ crop rotation techniques in your organic garden. Typically thought of for large-scale farms, crop rotation can be useful even in a small garden plot. After a season or two of growing one crop, switch to a dissimilar crop the following year. This will prevent soil depletion and pest build-up caused by growing one plant and result in your gardening success.

Organic gardening is a fascinating and exciting world that is only limited by your knowledge and environment. There are endless products and techniques you can sue for your organic garden. Start experimenting to find something new to use on your organic garden or even improve upon a technique. Use these tips to grow!

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